Tag: Thomas Brooks

The more a Christian is tried

Thomas Brooksby Thomas Brooks

1608-1680

“Before I was afflicted I went astray, but now I obey Your Word.” Psalm 119:67

“It was good for me to be afflicted so that I might learn Your decrees.” Psalm 119:71

By trials, God makes sin more hateful and the world less delightful. God had but one Son without corruption–but He had none without afflictions!

By trials the Lord will make His people more and more conformable to the image of His Son. Christ was much tried–He was often in the school of affliction; and the more a Christian is tried, the more into the likeness of Christ he will be transformed. The most afflicted Christians do most resemble Christ in meekness, lowliness, holiness, heavenliness, etc. The image of Christ is most fairly stamped upon afflicted souls.

Tried souls are much in looking up to Jesus–and every gracious look upon Christ changes the soul more and more into the image of Christ. Afflicted souls experience much of the comforts of Christ, and the more they experience the sweet of the comforts of Christ–the more they grow up into the likeness of Christ.

Afflictions are the tools by which the Father does more and more carve, form, and fashion His precious saints into the similitude and likeness of His dearest Son.

“I know, O LORD, that Your laws are righteous, and in faithfulness You have afflicted me. May Your unfailing love be my comfort, according to Your promise to your servant.” Psalm 119:75-76

by Thomas Brooks

He left Heaven for us

Thomas Brooksby Thomas Brooks

“The Golden Key to Open Hidden Treasures”

“If anyone would come after Me–he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow Me.” Matthew 16:24

Let the sufferings of our Lord Jesus Christ, work us into a gracious willingness to embrace sufferings for His sake, and cheerfully and resolutely to take up His cross and follow Him.

Did Christ suffer, who knew no sin–and shall we think it strange to suffer, who know nothing but sin? Shall He lie sweltering under His Father’s wrath–and shall we cry out under men’s anger?

Was He crowned with thorns–and must we be crowned with rose-buds? Was His whole life, from the cradle to the cross, made up of nothing but sorrows and sufferings–and must our lives, from the cradle to the grave, be filled up with nothing but pleasures and delights? Was He despised–and must we be admired? Was He debased–and must we be exalted? Was He poor–and must we be rich? Was He low–and must we be high?

Did He drink of a bitter cup, a bloody cup–and must we have only cups of consolation?

Let us not think anything too much to do for Christ, nor anything too great to suffer for Christ, nor anything too dear to part with for such a Christ, such a Savior–who thought nothing too much to do, nor too grievous to suffer–so that He might accomplish the work of our redemption!

He left Heaven for us–and shall not we let go of this world for Him? He left his Father’s bosom for us–and shall not we leave the bosoms of our dearest relations for him? He underwent all sorts of sufferings for us–let us as readily encounter with all sorts of sufferings for Him.

by Thomas Brooks