Tag: Stephen

What Story Does Your Face Tell?

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

King David boldly declared, “I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God” (Psalm 42:11, KJV). He repeats the exact same statement in Psalm 43:5.

Your face is a billboard that advertises what is going on in your heart. All the joy or turmoil that’s inside you is reflected on your countenance — your facial expression, your body language, your tone of voice. For example, when one’s mind is loaded down with the cares of life, the shoulders may slouch, the brows may furrow, the face may look drawn.

Many of us need to be careful of our facial expression because we could be sending the wrong message to the world. Your face is the index of your soul and reflects what is going on inside your heart.

Indeed, the very presence of Christ in your heart has a direct impact on your face! It also affects your walk and your talk. Worry can also harden a person’s face, just as much as gross sin can. We all know that as Christians we aren’t to worry — our Lord is fully aware of all our needs and problems — and yet somehow we do get stressed at times.

What does your face say to a lost, confused generation? When Stephen stood before hostile, angry men in the Sanhedrin, “his face [shone] as the face of an angel” (Acts 6:15). In the midst of these unbelievers Stephen stood with the shine of Jesus on him and the difference was clear to all. In contrast, these men in the synagogue council were so angry at Stephen that “they gnashed at him with their teeth” (7:54). “A wicked man hardens his face” (Proverbs 21:29). Sin and anger are reflected on one’s countenance just as distinctly as joy and peace.

As God’s child, you know that the Lord cares for you and loves your unconditionally (1 Peter 5:7). His heart is moved toward you at all times and you can walk in glorious freedom. That should lift your countenance!

by David Wilkerson

We Become What We Behold

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

Stephen saw an open heaven and a glorified Man on the throne whose glory was mirrored in him to all who stood nearby. “But he, being full of the Holy Spirit, gazed into heaven and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God, and said, ‘Look! I see the heavens opened and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God!’” (Acts 7:55-56).

Stephen represents what a true Christian is supposed to be: one who is full of the Holy Spirit with eyes fixed on the Man in glory. One who mirrors that glory in such a way that all who see it will be amazed and filled with wonder.

Stephen was in a hopeless condition, surrounded by religious madness, superstition, prejudice, and jealousy. The angry crowds pressed in on him, wild-eyed and bloodthirsty, and death loomed just ahead of him. Such impossible circumstances! But looking up into heaven, Stephen beheld his Lord in glory and suddenly his rejection here on earth meant nothing to him. Now he was above it all.

One glimpse of the Lord’s glory, one vision of his holiness, and Stephen could no longer be hurt. The stones, the angry cursing, all was harmless to him because of the joy set before him. Likewise, a glimpse of Christ’s glory places you above all your circumstances. Keeping your eyes on Christ, consciously reaching out to him every waking hour, provides peace and serenity as nothing else can.

Stephen caught the rays of the glorified Man in heaven and reflected them to a Christ-rejecting society: “with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord … being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord” (2 Corinthians 3:18).

It is so true that we become what we behold. Stephen became a living mirror in which men could see the glory of Jesus reflected. So, should we! When the enemy comes in like a flood, we need to both amaze and condemn the world around us by our sweet, calm repose in Christ. This is accomplished by keeping our minds on our Savior.

by David Wilkerson