Tag: Separation

It is better to stay at home and read God’s Word

A.W. Pinkby A.W. Pink

“A Call to Separation”

“Do not be yoked together with unbelievers. For what do righteousness and wickedness have in common? Or what fellowship can light have with darkness? What harmony is there between Christ and the Devil? What does a believer have in common with an unbeliever? 2 Corinthians 6:14-16What agreement is there between the temple of God and idols?” 2 Corinthians 6:14-16

This command is so plain, that it requires no interpreter. Righteousness–and wickedness; light–and darkness; Christ–and the Devil; God’s temple–and idols. What do they have in common?

This is a call to godly separation. This passage gives utterance to a Divine exhortation for those belonging to Christ–to hold aloof from all intimate associations with the ungodly. It expressly forbids them entering into alliances with the unconverted. It definitely prohibits the children of God walking arm-in-arm with worldlings. It is an admonition applying to every phase and department of our lives–religious, domestic, social, commercial. And never, perhaps, was there a time when it more needed pressing on Christians, than now. The days in which we are living are marked by the spirit of compromise. On every side we behold unholy mixtures, ungodly alliances, and unequal yokes. Many professing Christians appear to be trying how near to the world they may walk–and yet go to Heaven!

To Israel, God said, “So do not act like the people in Egypt, where you used to live, or like the people of Canaan, where I am taking you. You must not imitate their way of life. You must obey all My regulations and be careful to keep My laws, for I, the Lord, am your God!” (Leviticus 18:3-4) And again, “Do not live by the customs of the people whom I will expel before you. It is because they do these terrible things–that I detest them so much!” (Leviticus 20:23) It was for their disregard of these very prohibitions, that Israel brought down upon themselves such severe chastisements.

God’s call to His people in Babylon is, “Come out of her, My people! Do not take part in her sins!” (Revelation 18:4) No one can be a whole-hearted follower of the Lord Jesus who is, in any way, “yoked” to His enemies!

“Do not be yoked together with unbelievers.” This applies first to our religious connections. How many Christians are members of so-called “churches,” where much is going on which they know is at direct variance with the Word of God–either the teaching from the pulpit, the worldly attractions used to draw the ungodly, and the worldly methods employed to finance it, or the constant receiving into its membership of those who give no evidence of having been born again. Believers in Christ who remain in such “churches” are dishonoring their Lord.

Should they answer: “Practically all the churches are the same, and were we to resign, what would we do? We must go somewhere on Sundays!” Such language would show they are putting their own interests, before the glory of Christ. It is better to stay at home and read God’s Word–than fellowship with that which His Word condemns!

by A.W. Pink

Abraham’s Life of Faith

Oswald Chambersby Oswald Chambers

He went out, not knowing where he was going. —Hebrews 11:8

In the Old Testament, a person’s relationship with God was seen by the degree of separation in that person’s life. This separation is exhibited in the life of Abraham by his separation from his country and his family. When we think of separation today, we do not mean to be literally separated from those family members who do not have a personal relationship with God, but to be separated mentally and morally from their viewpoints. This is what Jesus Christ was referring to in Luke 14:26.

Living a life of faith means never knowing where you are being led. But it does mean loving and knowing the One who is leading. It is literally a life of faith, not of understanding and reason— a life of knowing Him who calls us to go. Faith is rooted in the knowledge of a Person, and one of the biggest traps we fall into is the belief that if we have faith, God will surely lead us to success in the world.

The final stage in the life of faith is the attainment of character, and we encounter many changes in the process. We feel the presence of God around us when we pray, yet we are only momentarily changed. We tend to keep going back to our everyday ways and the glory vanishes. A life of faith is not a life of one glorious mountaintop experience after another, like soaring on eagles’ wings, but is a life of day-in and day-out consistency; a life of walking without fainting (see Isaiah 40:31). It is not even a question of the holiness of sanctification, but of something which comes much farther down the road. It is a faith that has been tried and proved and has withstood the test. Abraham is not a type or an example of the holiness of sanctification, but a type of the life of faith— a faith, tested and true, built on the true God. “Abraham believed God…” (Romans 4:3).

by Oswald Chambers