Tag: Psalms

Avoiding the Sin of Doubt

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

Asaph, a Levite, was a chief singer and leader of King David’s choral worshipers; in fact, he is credited with writing eleven of the Psalms. He was a very close friend to David and the two loved being in the house of God together. Yet, in spite of his tremendous calling and blessings, Asaph confessed, “But as for me, my feet had almost stumbled; my steps had nearly slipped” (Psalm 73:2).

Now, we know Asaph was a pure-hearted man who believed God was good. In fact, he began his discourse in this psalm by saying, “Truly God is good to Israel, to such as are pure in heart” (73:1).

Yet, in the very next verse Asaph confesses that he almost slipped. Why did he declare this? He notes that he saw the wicked around him prospering while they neglected God’s commands and it would have been easy for Asaph to wonder why God didn’t “balance the books,” so to speak.

Have you ever wondered why blessings are being heaped on people who live duplicitous lives? Perhaps you’ve seen an ungodly coworker rewarded instead of you or an unconverted neighbor acquire material things while you struggled to make ends meet.

It can be very easy for suffering Christians to slide into a grievous sin — the sin of doubt. They may think, “I’ve been living right but all my strictness and diligence to study God’s Word, my praising and worshiping, have been in vain. In spite of all I do, I still suffer.

Beloved, that is when you must be careful. When your trial comes upon you, when you’re grieving or discouraged, you need to guard your heart against slipping into doubt. Don’t let your faith or your confidence be shaken. God is still on the throne. Get your eyes off your trials and put your eyes on the Lord himself. God will help you to love him and never slip into unbelief.

Asaph saw that he had almost slipped but he held on to proclaim, “I have put my trust in the Lord God, that I may declare all Your works” (73:28). And you can do the same!

by David Wilkerson

We serve a righteous king!

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

The Lord rules over all of creation with majesty and power. His laws govern the whole universe — all of nature, every nation, and all the affairs of men. He rules over the seas, the planets, the heavenly bodies and all their movements.

“He rules by His power forever; His eyes observe the nations” (Psalm 66:7).

“The Lord reigns, He is clothed with majesty; the Lord is clothed, He has girded Himself with strength … Your throne is established from of old; You are from everlasting … Your testimonies are very sure” (Psalm 93:1-2, 5).

These psalms were written by David, who is testifies, in essence, “Lord, your testimonies — your laws, decrees and words — are irrevocable. They are utterly reliable.” The author of Hebrews echoes this, declaring that God’s Living Word is eternal and unchangeable (see Hebrews 13:8).

Think about it. There are laws operating in the universe that govern how things work, without exception. Consider the laws that rule the movements of the sun, moon, stars and earth. These heavenly bodies were all put into place when God spoke a word, and since that time they have been ruled by laws that God also spoke into being.

The New Testament tells us that this great God is our Father and he takes pity on his children. “For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feelings of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15, KJV). God hears our every cry: “The righteous cry out, and the Lord hears, and delivers them out of all their troubles” (Psalm 34:17).

We are also told that God is the righteous King who judges by his law. His Word is his constitution, containing all of his legal decrees, by which he rules justly. Everything in existence is judged by his immutable Word — including his children!

Simply put, we can hold the Bible in our hands and know, “This book tells me who God is. It describes his attributes, nature, promises and judgments. It is his rule of law, from his own mouth, by which he rules and reigns.

What a mighty God we serve!

by David Wilkerson