Tag: Pray Without Ceasing

Spiritual Rest and Fullness

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

“[The plain of] Sharon shall be a fold of flocks, and the Valley of Achor a place for herds to lie down, for My people who have sought Me” (Isaiah 65:10).

God promises that if his children will seek him continually with all their heart, they will always have plenty of spiritual food. Yet those who do not seek God will be empty, famished, dry — wandering about, looking for a shepherd, hungry and never satisfied. The Word says, “You shall be hungry … thirsty … ashamed” (verse 13). But it also says, “Behold, My servants shall eat … drink … rejoice …sing for joy” (verses 13-14).

Those who are shut in with God — pouring out their hearts to him and seeking him in everything — will have power, authority, spiritual strength, food for soul and mind. They will be led by God into a place of spiritual rest and fullness.

Psalm 91 is the favorite Scripture passage of many believers. Such great promises are found here! The entire psalm is a revelation of the delivering, keeping power that comes from living in an attitude of seeking God. The person who lives in this habitation of prayer will have power over all demonic snares, all fear, all sickness and plague — power to prevail and bring forth results in prayer. But there is a condition for this, and it is found in the first verse:

“He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty” (Psalm 91:1)

Dwell” means to live in his presence. You may wonder, “Does this mean I have to pray all the time?” In a manner of speaking, yes. Paul said, “Pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17). That means to let your mind be stayed on God in your every waking hour.

Beloved, all throughout the day, in everything, call upon God in your spirit and you will know his power and order in your every step!

by David Wilkerson

Thinking of Prayer as Jesus Taught

Oswald Chambersby Oswald Chambers

Pray without ceasing… —1 Thessalonians 5:17

Our thinking about prayer, whether right or wrong, is based on our own mental conception of it. The correct concept is to think of prayer as the breath in our lungs and the blood from our hearts. Our blood flows and our breathing continues “without ceasing”; we are not even conscious of it, but it never stops. And we are not always conscious of Jesus keeping us in perfect oneness with God, but if we are obeying Him, He always is. Prayer is not an exercise, it is the life of the saint. Beware of anything that stops the offering up of prayer. “Pray without ceasing…”— maintain the childlike habit of offering up prayer in your heart to God all the time.

Jesus never mentioned unanswered prayer. He had the unlimited certainty of knowing that prayer is always answered. Do we have through the Spirit of God that inexpressible certainty that Jesus had about prayer, or do we think of the times when it seemed that God did not answer our prayer? Jesus said, “…everyone who asks receives…” (Matthew 7:8). Yet we say, “But…, but….” God answers prayer in the best way— not just sometimes, but every time. However, the evidence of the answer in the area we want it may not always immediately follow. Do we expect God to answer prayer?

The danger we have is that we want to water down what Jesus said to make it mean something that aligns with our common sense. But if it were only common sense, what He said would not even be worthwhile. The things Jesus taught about prayer are supernatural truths He reveals to us.

by Oswald Chambers