Tag: Hebrew

The World Of Campers

Jonathan Cahnby Jonathan Cahn

Chag Sukkot is the Hebrew name for the celebration of the Feast of Tabernacles. This was because, during the feast, every worshiper camped out in a sukkah; a type of tent, under the skies of Jerusalem.

There is a profound truth here. Israel was home in the Promised Land, and you don’t normally camp out at home. But God wanted them to remember the days when they journeyed through the wilderness in tents, and when God camped out with them. The Promised Land speaks of Heaven, and the wilderness speaks of this present life. Nothing here lasts forever, and all your circumstances are only tents on your journey to the place where things do last forever. Remember, you’re camping. In the Promised Land, you’ll dwell in places that never pass away. And there you’ll remember this life as the days of your camping out; as tents in which you slept the night. And you’ll give thanks and say “how lovely were your dwelling places”- because God was there with you – those were the days of your journeying when you camped out with God in tents.

Today’s Mission – Today, view this world and this life in a new way as a camping trip, where everything is a temporary tent – and live in view of your final destination – heaven.

by Jonathan Cahn

Commemorating Your Midbar

Jonathan Cahnby Jonathan Cahn

Midbar is the Hebrew word for wilderness. We usually think of the wilderness as a single place, but it’s really not. There are many Hebrew names for various wildernesses. For instance, there’s Midbar Yehuda; the Wilderness of Judea where John preached. Then there’s Midbar Negev; the Wilderness of the Negev where Abraham pitched his tent. And there’s Midbar Sinai; the Wilderness of Sinai through which Moses and the Israelites journeyed. Then there are a host of other smaller wildernesses: Midbar Zin, Midbar Paran, and so on.

Each wilderness had a different name. The Hebrews didn’t just go through wildernesses. They named each of them. It means they wanted to remember them. They saw them as something meaningful in some way. So, we all go through wildernesses. Rarely do we value them or seek to remember them. But you should remember them. For God uses them to grow you and make you more like Him. So rejoice in your wilderness because in the Lord it will only be used for good as you look to Him. For the Hebrews gave names to their midbars.

Today’s Mission – Today, give thanks to God for your wilderness, even give a beautiful name to a wilderness in your life that ended up bringing you to God’s blessings.

by Jonathan Cahn