Tag: He Must Increase But I Must Decrease

The sin before us is a very old one!

J.C. Ryleby J.C. Ryle

The Gospel of Luke” 1858

“Then they began to argue among themselves about who would be the greatest among them.” Luke 22:24

We see in this passage how firmly pride and love of preeminence can stick to the hearts of Christian men. The strife was one which had been rebuked by our Lord on a former occasion. The Lord’s Supper which the disciples had just been receiving, and the circumstances under which they were assembled–made the strife particularly inappropriate.

And yet at this very season, the last quiet time they could spend with their Master before His death–this little flock begins to argue among themselves about who would be the greatest!

Such is the heart of man–ever weak, ever prideful, ever ready, even at its best times, to turn aside to what is evil!

The sin before us is a very old one. Ambition, self-esteem, and self-conceit–lie deep at the bottom of all men’s hearts, and often in the hearts where they are least suspected! Thousands imagine that they are humble, who cannot bear to see an equal more honored and favored than themselves. Few indeed can be found who rejoice heartily in another’s promotion over themselves.

If we make any profession of serving Christ, then let us live on our guard against this great evil. The harm that it has done to the Church of Christ, is far beyond calculation. Let us learn to take pleasure in the prosperity of others, and to be content with the lowest place for ourselves. The rule given to the Philippians should be often before our eyes, “In lowliness of mind–let each esteem others better than themselves.” The example of John the Baptist is a bright instance of the spirit at which we should aim. He said of our Lord, “He must increase, but I must decrease.

by J.C. Ryle

Second Fiddle

Vance Havner Imageby Vance Havner

And now, behold, the king walketh before you: and I am old and grayheaded. 1 Samuel 12:2

Samuel was a better man than Saul, but he knew how to take a back seat graciously. Blessed are the Saints of the Second Fiddle! Some want to do solo work or be the whole orchestra. Saul had no grace for second place. When he heard the women singing, “Saul hath slain his thousands and David his ten thousands,” he “was very wroth and the saying displeased him.” Some preachers have been known to react that way when eclipsed by one more successful.

The best men are not always kings. “I have seen servants upon horses and princes walking as servants upon the earth.” Diotrephes loves the pre-eminence. “In honor preferring one another”-surely that grace languishes for want of exercise!

John the Baptist was in his heyday as the foremost prophet and preacher of his time when he said of Jesus, “He must increase but I must decrease.” God grant us the Beatitude of the Background, that only He may be seen!

Samuel took the back seat for a lesser, John the Baptist for a greater. Can you play second fiddle, whether for a lesser or for the Greatest of All?

by Vance Havner