Tag: Christians

Can Christians Stay Pure Today?

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

Is it possible for a Christian to stay clean and pure in a world filled with violence, immorality, and corruption? Or is it inevitable that the spirit of this age will wear down the saints of God and vex their souls? It happened to Lot and his family in Sodom, and it is happening to multitudes of Christians all around the world. The overwhelming temptations of this evil generation have already caused numbers of Christians to compromise and indulge in ungodly practices.

Truly honest Christians must take inventory and ask of themselves these important questions, “Are my moral values changing? Is the wickedness of this age seeping into my life? Am I being affected by the barrage of sensuality I see all around me? Am I developing an appetite for worldly things?

Evil has always been present. The devil tried to tempt and deceive David, Isaiah, Paul, and the people of God in every generation just as forcefully as he seeks to devour God’s people today. In spite of it all, God has always had a remnant, people who remained true to the end. The spirit of the age did not overwhelm them. In fact, they grew strong and holy in the midst of persecution and evil.

This generation is becoming wicked and vile because it is losing its faith in God — and that faith is dissipating because the Bible is no longer consumed as a life-giving force. Do not blame the devil — our backslidings are the result of one thing: lack of prayer and Bible reading.

We need to be praying, “Oh, God, cause me to see how cold I have become. Cause me to know how weak I am and put in me a new hunger for spiritual things.” Here is God’s desire to all who live in the midst of wickedness: “That you may become blameless and harmless, children of God without fault in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world” (Philippians 2:15).

Let your light shine!

by David Wilkerson

Guarding against drifting from Christ

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

It is possible for Christians to become spiritually neglectful, caught up in prayerlessness, going for days without seeking God’s Word. Yes, the Bible clearly warns that it is possible for devoted believers to drift from Christ and it offers powerful warnings about guarding against falling asleep in the midnight hour: “Therefore we must give the more earnest heed to the things we have heard, lest we drift away. For if the word spoken through angels proved steadfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just reward, how shall we escape if we neglect so great a salvation?” (Hebrews 2:1-3).

There are biblical examples of once-strong churches that ended up drifting. In Revelation, we read of the Ephesian church grieving Christ by drifting away from their first love (Revelation 2:4). Likewise, the Laodicean church drifted into lukewarmness (3:15), and the church at Sardis drifted into spiritual death (3:2). Paul warns the believers in Galatia that they had wandered from the victory of Christ’s cross and had turned back to works of the flesh (see Galatians 1:6-7).

Paul warns, “See then that you walk circumspectly, not as fools but as wise, redeeming the time, because the days are evil. Therefore do not be unwise, but understand what the will of the Lord is” (Ephesians 5:15).

How can you guard against drifting from Christ and neglecting “so great a salvation”? Paul tells us to “give heed” to the things we have heard. Speed reading through God’s Word may give one a feeling of accomplishment, but the more important thing is that you “hear” what you read with spiritual ears. Meditate on the Word so that it is heard in your heart.

Paul says, “Examine yourselves as to whether you are in the faith. Test yourselves. Do you not know yourselves, that Jesus Christ is in you?” (2 Corinthians 13:5). He is encouraging them, “As lovers of Christ, test yourself; take a spiritual inventory of your walk with Jesus.” I encourage you to do the same. How is your communion with Christ? Are you guarding it with all diligence?

by David Wilkerson