Tag: Choosing

What we prefer

A.B. Simpsonby A.B. Simpson

Therefore, choose —Deuteronomy 30:19

Men are choosing every day the spiritual or earthly. And as we choose we are taking our place unconsciously with the friends of Christ or the world. It is not merely what we say; it is what we prefer.

When Solomon made his great choice at Gibeon, God said to him, Because this was in thine heart . . . to ask wisdom, . . . wisdom and knowledge is granted unto thee; and I will give thee riches, and wealth, and honour, such as none of the kings have had that have been before thee (2 Chronicles 1:11-12). It was not merely that he said it because it was right to say and would please God if he said it. But it was the thing his heart preferred, and God saw it in his heart and gave it to him, along with riches, wealth and honor that he had not chosen.

What are we choosing? it is our choice that settles our destiny. It is not how we feel, but how we purpose. Have we chosen the good part? Have we said, “Whatever else I am or have, let me be God’s child; let me have His favor and blessing; let me please Him?” Or have we said, I must have this thing, and then I will see about religion?” Alas, God has seen what was in our hearts, and perhaps He has already said, “They have their reward.

by A.B. Simpson

Choosing God’s Will

A.W. Tozerby A.W. Tozer

I desire to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart. Psalm 40:8

No act that is done voluntarily is an abrogation of the freedom of will. If a man chooses the will of God he is not denying but exercising his right of choice. What he is doing is admitting that he is not good enough to desire the highest choice nor is he wise enough to make it, and he is for that reason asking Another who is both wise and good to make his choice for him. And for fallen man this is the ultimate use he should make of his freedom of will. Tennyson saw this and wrote of Christ, Thou seemest human and divine, The highest, holiest manhood, Thou; Our wills are ours, we know not how; Our wills are ours, to make them Thine. There is a lot of sound doctrine in these words–“Our wills are ours, to make them Thine.” The secret of saintliness is not the destruction of the will but the submergence of it in the will of God.

The true saint is one who acknowledges that he possesses from God the gift of freedom. He knows that he will never be cudgled into obedience nor wheedled like a petulant child into doing the will of God; he knows that these methods are unworthy both of God and of his own soul. He knows he is free to make any choice he will, and with that knowledge he chooses forever the blessed will of God.

by A.W. Tozer