How does it fare with your family?

Charles Spurgeonby Charles Spurgeon

Treasury of David

“I will be careful to lead a blameless life . . . I will walk in my house with a blameless heart.” Psalm 101:2

Piety must begin at home. Our first duties are those within our own abode. We must have a blameless heart at home, or we cannot keep a blameless way abroad. Notice that these words are a part of a song. There is no music like the harmony of a gracious life, no psalm so sweet as the daily practice of holiness.

Reader, how does it fare with your family? Do you sing in the choir, and sin in the chamber? Are you a saint abroad, and a devil at home? For shame!

What we are at home, that we are indeed!

He cannot be a true saint whose habitation is a scene of strife, and whose household dreads his appearance at the fireside.

by Charles Spurgeon

Better Farther On

A.W. Tozerby A.W. Tozer

Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures. Luke 24:45

Truth that is not experienced is no better than error and may be fully as dangerous. Remember that the scribes who sat in Moses’ seat were not the victims of error; they were the victims of failure to experience the truth they taught! We should see that one of the greatest foes of the Christian is religious complacency. The man who believes that he has “arrived” will not go any further; and the present neat habit of quoting a text to prove we have arrived may be a dangerous one if, in truth, we have no actual inward experience of the text. The great saints of the past have all had yearning hearts. Their longing after God all but consumed them; it propelled them onward and upward to heights toward which less ardent Christians look with languid eye and entertain no hope of reaching. May we offer this word of exhortation: pray on, fight on, sing on! Press on into the deep things of God. Keep your feet on the ground, but let your heart soar as high as it will!

by A.W. Tozer