Month: June 2019

Vessels of God’s Glory

David Wilkersonby David Wilkerson

God has not forgotten you! He knows exactly where you are, what you are going through right now, and he is monitoring every step along your path. Too often in times of crisis, Christians forget that God has them in the palm of his hand. Instead, like the children of Israel, they are afraid they are going to be destroyed by the enemy. God must find it difficult to understand why his children do not trust him when they are down and in need. “Don’t they know I have inscribed them on the palms of My hands? I could no more forget them in their hour of need than a mother could forget her nursing child” (see Isaiah 49:15-16).

Again and again God came to Israel pleading for their confidence and trust in times of crises. “For thus says the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel: ‘In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and confidence shall be your strength.’ But you would not” (Isaiah 30:15).

It seems even the New Testament echoes God’s displeasure with unbelief: “Ask in faith, with no doubting, for he who doubts is like a wave of the sea driven and tossed by the wind. For let not that man suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways” (James 1:6-8).

Have you ever felt that God has forsaken you and left you to figure things out for yourself? Instead of submitting to the Lord in quiet confidence and rest in his promises, you may have tried to find your own solutions and things have blown up in your face.

Be assured that God wants to meet your every need but, most of all, he wants renewed fellowship with you. Get back to the secret closet of prayer and simple, childlike faith. Do not get so busy working on God that you forget he is trying to work on you, making you into a vessel of glory.

by David Wilkerson

Take heed what you ask for!

Charles Spurgeonby Charles Spurgeon

“He prayed that he might die!” 1 Kings 19:4

It was a remarkable thing that the man who was never to die, for whom God had ordained an infinitely better lot, the man who would be carried to Heaven in a chariot of fire, and be translated that he should not see death–should thus pray, “Let me die! I am no better than my fathers.”

We have here a memorable proof that God does not always answer prayer in kind, though He always does in effect. He gave Elijah something better than that which he asked for, and thus really heard and answered him.

Strange was it that the lion-hearted Elijah should be so depressed by Jezebel’s threat as to ask to die–and blessedly kind was it on the part of our heavenly Father, that He did not give His desponding servant what he prayed for.

There is a limit to prayer. We are not to expect that God will give us everything we choose to ask for. We know that we sometimes ask, and do not receive, because we ask amiss.

If we ask for that which is not promised,
if we run counter to the spirit which the Lord would have us cultivate,
if we ask contrary to His will, or to the decrees of His providence,
if we ask merely for the gratification of our own ease,
if we ask without an eye to His glory,
–then we must not expect that we shall receive what we pray for.

Yet, if we do not receive the precise thing asked for, we shall receive an equivalent, and more than an equivalent, for it. As one remarks, “If the Lord does not pay in silver, He will in gold; and if He does not pay in gold, He will in diamonds!” If He does not give you precisely what you ask for, He will give you that which is tantamount to it, and that which you will greatly rejoice to receive in lieu thereof.

Be then, dear reader, much in prayer–but take heed what you ask for!

by Charles Spurgeon