Day: July 29, 2013

Do You See Jesus In Your Clouds?

Oswald Chambers Imageby Oswald Chambers

Behold, He is coming with clouds . . . —Revelation 1:7

In the Bible clouds are always associated with God. Clouds are the sorrows, sufferings, or providential circumstances, within or without our personal lives, which actually seem to contradict the sovereignty of God. Yet it is through these very clouds that the Spirit of God is teaching us how to walk by faith. If there were never any clouds in our lives, we would have no faith. “The clouds are the dust of His feet” (Nahum 1:3). They are a sign that God is there. What a revelation it is to know that sorrow, bereavement, and suffering are actually the clouds that come along with God! God cannot come near us without clouds— He does not come in clear-shining brightness.

It is not true to say that God wants to teach us something in our trials. Through every cloud He brings our way, He wants us to unlearn something. His purpose in using the cloud is to simplify our beliefs until our relationship with Him is exactly like that of a child— a relationship simply between God and our own souls, and where other people are but shadows. Until other people become shadows to us, clouds and darkness will be ours every once in a while. Is our relationship with God becoming more simple than it has ever been?

There is a connection between the strange providential circumstances allowed by God and what we know of Him, and we have to learn to interpret the mysteries of life in the light of our knowledge of God. Until we can come face to face with the deepest, darkest fact of life without damaging our view of God’s character, we do not yet know Him.

“. . . they were fearful as they entered the cloud” (Luke 9:34). Is there anyone except Jesus in your cloud? If so, it will only get darker until you get to the place where there is “no one anymore, but only Jesus . . .” (Mark 9:8 ; also see Mark 2-7).

by Oswald Chambers

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“Then The Lord…”

Vance Havner Imageby Vance Havner

When my father and my mother forsake me, then the Lord will take me up. Psalm 27:10

From childhood we like protection and security, someone to turn to. But loved ones fail us in one way or another. Death takes them, distance divides us, other circumstances render them unable to come to our aid. Some know the bitterness of being cast out or deserted by their own people. Precious as is the love and companionship and assistance of our dear ones, we had better not make that our main stay. We can be bereft of them in a moment and forsaken in tragic ways. Sometimes they remain, but because of infirmity cannot help us any more.

But when the choicest companions cannot walk with us, God says, “I will never leave thee nor forsake thee.” It was a desolate man, forsaken of one he thought loved him, who penned out of his desperation, “O Love that wilt not let me go.” It is well to reckon on the possibility of utter bereavement, of being forsaken by those we hold dearest; but along with it we may count on the promise of never being forsaken by Him who is dearest of all. At the point of darkest human loneliness – then the Lord.

by Vance Havner