Death is but a moment

A.B. Simpsonby A.B. Simpson

He purgeth it, that it may bring forth more fruit —John 15:2

Recently I passed a garden. The gardener had finished his pruning and the wounds of the knife and saw were just beginning to heal. The warm April sun was gently nourishing the stricken plant into fresh life and energy.

As I looked at that plant I thought how cruel it would be were the owner to begin next week to cut it down. The gardener’s business now is to revive and nourish it into life. Its business is not to die, but to live.

So it is with the discipline of the soul. It, too, has its dying hour, but it must not always be dying. Rather we are to reckon ourselves to be dead unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Death is but a moment. We should live, then, as children of the resurrection, depending more and more on His glorious life. The fullness of our lives will then repel the intrusion of self and sin and overcome evil with good. Our existence will not then be the dreary repression of our own struggling but the springing tide of Christ’s spontaneous overcoming and everlasting life.

by A.B. Simpson

Do You Walk In White?

Oswald Chambersby Oswald Chambers

We were buried with Him…that just as Christ was raised from the dead…even so we also should walk in newness of life. —Romans 6:4

No one experiences complete sanctification without going through a “white funeral” — the burial of the old life. If there has never been this crucial moment of change through death, sanctification will never be more than an elusive dream. There must be a “white funeral,” a death with only one resurrection— a resurrection into the life of Jesus Christ. Nothing can defeat a life like this. It has oneness with God for only one purpose— to be a witness for Him.

Have you really come to your last days? You have often come to them in your mind, but have you really experienced them? You cannot die or go to your funeral in a mood of excitement. Death means you stop being. You must agree with God and stop being the intensely striving kind of Christian you have been. We avoid the cemetery and continually refuse our own death. It will not happen by striving, but by yielding to death. It is dying— being “baptized into His death” (Romans 6:3).

Have you had your “white funeral,” or are you piously deceiving your own soul? Has there been a point in your life which you now mark as your last day? Is there a place in your life to which you go back in memory with humility and overwhelming gratitude, so that you can honestly proclaim, “Yes, it was then, at my ‘white funeral,’ that I made an agreement with God.”

“This is the will of God, your sanctification…” (1 Thessalonians 4:3). Once you truly realize this is God’s will, you will enter into the process of sanctification as a natural response. Are you willing to experience that “white funeral” now? Will you agree with Him that this is your last day on earth? The moment of agreement depends on you.

by Oswald Chambers